Some Common Overhead Crane Hazards Tips to Help Avoid Them

Some Common Overhead Crane Hazards and Tips On How to Prevent Them

Preventing Overhead Crane Hazards: In any type of industry, the coming together of anticipation and pro-actively handling problems is something, which does result in greater success than just reactively responding to incidents. If an individual works in the world of construction and manufacturing, there are hazards always present at job sites, but with proper training and preparation ahead for them, a lot of issues can be prevented.

In order to keep all those involved safe, all operators and workers need to understand the most basic of all safety hazards, and how to recognize any of them right away. Please read on to learn more about the many potential risks that are a part of overhead cranes and the accompanying preventable measures.

Potential Electrical Hazards

About 50% of all crane accidents that happen overhead can be attributed to machinery coming into contact with a power source of some kind during operation. Typically, why this occurs is because, as a crane moves materials close to or beneath energized power lines, the hoist line or boom gets into contact with the electrical source. This is an issue, which is about half of all hazards that are associated with these overhead cranes, and it can be stopped with good safety planning.

Safety planning that is effective can be done before the cranes even get to the worksite. It is important to establish who will be in charge of any and all pre-job safety. Every danger zone should be clearly marked, and this does specifically apply to, the 10-foot radius of all power lines of the entire area. The whole area should be considered to be an unsafe working place from the get go. The 10-foot radius can be marked with barriers, fences, taping, etc. to give clear visual clues for all workers.

In addition to this, make sure to ask electrical companies to de-energize or to ground any existing power lines when there are individuals working in close proximity to them. However, until specifically informed by the electrical company, all operators should assume that all power lines are energized and extremely dangerous. A final preventative measure is to make sure all ladders, tools, and other systems being used on the work site aren’t at all conductive.

Crane Overloading

When a crane exceeds over its operational capacity, it can also prove to be the very thing, which tends to cause about 80% of all crane accidents and structural failures as well. The overloading of the crane’s operational capacity is caused by some of the following:

  • The presence of swinging or a sudden dropping of any load
  • Any defective components
  • The hoisting of a load that is beyond its normal capacity
  • The dragging of a load
  • Whenever side-loading a boom

A lot of these mistakes are the result of predictable human error. The formal training for operators should have a working knowledge of some key points, and any conditions where stated lifting capacities happen to be valid. Some of these key points are crane load charts and lifting capacities. Operators shouldn’t just rely on instinct or experience to decide if weight load is correct.

Any Materials Falling

One of the best ways to lessen the chance of any materials falling down from cranes is clear. It is to make sure to perform regular maintenance of hoists. An example of this is to do load testing maintenance to ensure that you know how many pounds a hoist can handle exactly. It also will provide an accurate indication of just how well the hoist is functioning currently. Another way to reduce the chance of mechanical failure is by performing inspections of the crane each day. If, and when, a potential problem is identified by the operators, they need to make sure to implement the lockout/tag-out procedure.

Though it may be obvious, what should be clearly stated is this, that workers need to always wear the proper head, foot, hand, and eye protection while working on the job site itself. They also need to be constantly aware of what is going on in their surroundings. They don’t want to accidentally go walking beneath a suspended load at any time.

Here at TNT Crane Service, Inc., we always make sure to put safety and prevention first. It is our number one priority. Because of this fact, we ensure that all the machines we have are kept well maintained and up to date. What this does is ensures that you will be getting the most effective, as well as, the most reliable equipment that is available. Please view the equipment that we have on hand for sale or rental today. It may help you to find the crane that you require for your next major project coming up.

New Wire Rope Standard in the Works

New Wire Rope Standard in the Works

A proposed engineering standard for wire rope for cranes will have separate chapters for steel and synthetic ropes, a member of the committee working on the standard told a crane and rigging conference in Edmonton last fall.

At the time, Bill Fronzaglia expected the new standard, called ASME B30.30, would be approved by a ballot at a subcommittee meeting in January. However, according to a June 2016 public schedule from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, which develops the ASME standards, the B30.30 wire rope standard was still under development. And an agenda item from an ASME B30 standards committee meeting held in Houston in May 2016 noted that the ballot on the rope standards draft had been withdrawn. That was because of “the extent of the changes to the document” in evaluating comments.

The subcommittee planned a final review of a revised document after the May main committee meeting and anticipated “resubmitting a new first ballot shortly afterward.”

Deborah Wetzel, the society’s manager of media relations, confirmed by email in July that the B30.30 standard was still under development and had not just been approved by the B30 standards committee. Once that approval takes place, the public will have a chance to review the standard and submit comments during a public review process that will be announced on the ASME website at https://cstools.asme.org.

“Since our standards are developed under a consensus process, we are unable to predict when the committee will reach consensus on this new volume,” Wetzel said, adding that “a timeline for approval/publication is not available at this time.”

Of the 29 existing ASME B30 standards, “16 are incorporated into Canadian provincial and territorial regulations,” according to an August 2014 report of the Standards Council of Canada on hoisting and rigging regulations in Canada. However, none of the ASME B30 standards are incorporated into any federal Canadian regulations. As of August 2014, B.C. had incorporated 13 ASME B30 standards, the most of any Canadian jurisdiction. Yukon had incorporated 12, Nova Scotia, 10 Manitoba 6, and Newfoundland two. None of the other provinces or territories had incorporated any.

In Europe, the situation with synthetic rope is more complicated than in the U.S., Fronzaglia said. The European Union has a machinery directive that for a piece of equipment that doesn’t have a standard, a manufacturer can create a technical file and show evidence that it works and is safe, Fronzaglia said. That enables the manufacturer to place a CE mark on the product, such as on a high-performance sling.

However, the European Federation of Material Handling has met with major crane manufacturers to develop a standard “in a short period of time” that won’t be legally binding but will act as a guideline.

And the International Standards Organization in a meeting of Technical Committee 96’s subcommittee SC 3 redefined wire rope for cranes as applying to ropes “regardless of their material properties,” Fronzaglia said.

Basically that means the committee acknowledged the need to develop a synthetic crane rope standard, he added.

For all of us at TNT Crane, we realize that this is an integral part of crane safety.

Use Cranes In A Safe Manner

Use Cranes In A Safe Manner

How to perform the safe operation of cranes? Cranes have made a lot of things easier. In order to operate cranessuccessfully and efficiently, the safety considerations need to be taken into account. The safety of the persons operating the crane as well as the all others around it is of prime importance. Following are some tips which can be followed to ensure the safe operation of cranes:

License:

Obtaining the license of crane operation is the first thing that all the crane operators must do. The National Commission for the Certification of Crane Operators (NCCCO) handles the standards for crane operator certificates. Crane operators must prove their knowledge of efficient crane operation by obtaining the certification.

Mobile Crane Computer:

You should never override the computer of the mobile crane.

Be Mindful of Your Surroundings:

Be aware and alert about your surroundings. Be watchful and observe all overhead hazards, including power lines and nearby buildings.

Create a checklist before operation:

Prepare an operating manual which includes all the steps and safety procedures of the crane operation, along with a checklist. The checklist should include:

  • Checking hoist
  • Examination of loading chain
  • The place and positions of hooks

Ground Conditions:

Ensure that your mobile crane can easily be supported and safely operated on the site.

Pads and Cribbing:

Ensure that appropriate pads or cribbing are being used.

Don’t Ignore The Safe Working Load (SWL):

One can easily make a mistake of thinking to lift more than the SWL of the crane, which can be a really hazardous task. The definition of SWL is self-explanatory – the crane cannot lift more than that safely. Make sure that all the operators are using the right sized crane, sling and equipment for the current job.

No Slack Chains:

It does not matter if your workers are fresh or highly experienced, they should not operate the crane just based on their instincts as it can be very risky. The chain or wire must be taut and firm before lifting any load. The operators must ensure:

  • Never run the hook with a slack chain
  • The chain or wire must never be bent on sharp edges
  • If they see any damaged chain or wire, they must immediately report it

Oil and Fluid Levels:

Before staring the crane, ensure that there is sufficient gas, oil and any other type of required fluid.

Other Safety Precautions:

Indeed, even with all of the safety precautions, there is still a chance that accidents may happen and it is essential that you know what steps to take in case of an accident. Take all the necessary precautions like ensuring that the proper attire and safety equipment are worn by the operators.

Ensure that all the personnel are properly trained to handle an emergency situation so that the risks and problems may be minimized in case of an incident.

Conclusion:

Operating cranes with proper safety precautions can make the workplace safer and the work more efficient. Make sure that all the operators are licensed to operate the cranes in order to have a great working place with a safe atmosphere.

What is a mobile crane?

What is a mobile crane?

Technology has advanced to the point that mobile cranes can lift and move just about anything your heart desires, in a wide range of different situations. From carefully squeezing a kitchen sink in through a skylight window, to moving a grand piano from one floor to the next, there is little a mobile crane can’t take on. As a consequence, they come in all sorts of shapes, sizes and heights.

In fact, their versatility is such that it can be hard to keep track of what kind of mobile crane is required. Below, we pick apart the most common.

TNT Crane Canada Crawler Crane

Crawler Cranes: Working in partnership with telescopic and lattice booms, crawler cranes are self-propelled cranes on tracks. They are incredibly powerful machines that range from 90 to 1200 ton in capacity. Typically crawler cranes are used in bridge construction, concrete tilt up and wind farm installation projects.

tnt crane and rigging 500 ton all terrain crane

 

All Terrain Cranes: As the name suggests, this type of crane is an all wheel drive crane that can travel on both highways and gravel roads to get the crane into position for the lift. With the new engineering advancements in crane set up, these cranes are now ideal for remote job site locations like wind farms. Compared to the heavy lifting power of a crawler crane, all terrain cranes are easier to set up and move around the job site which means they can help the installation crews get the job done quicker.

Grove_RT600E_Rough_Terrain_Crane_p3

Rough Terrain Cranes: Specially designed to operate off road, rough terrain cranes have all-wheel drive capabilities and rubber tires to help them navigate ditches and potholes in the road. With lower capacity lifting abilities, these cranes work well in situations where the lift radius and rough ground conditions don’t need high or heavy lifts. Many iron framed buildings implement the use of rough terrain cranes.

 

carry deck crane

Carry Deck Cranes: This type of mobile crane can rotate on a full 360 degrees axis, making them perfect for operating in confined construction areas. Exactly as the name suggests, carry deck cranes have small decks where they can lift and place equipment, like barrels, onto it’s deck and relocate it to another location on the job site.

Hydraulic Cranes: Run on hydraulics, oil is pushed from one cylinder to another to give this type of crane its awesome strength. Hydraulic mobile cranes are robust and reliable, so it comes as no surprise that they’re the most common. Most cranes today are hydraulic because of their safety features and smooth operation.

TNTImage960-7

An increase in the construction of building projects in challenging places means mobile cranes are heavily leaned upon to problem solve. The demand has led to the production of super large cranes with increased capabilities, such as the 500 to crane from LeibherrGrove or LinkBelt – a machine we frequently put to good use at Eagle West Cranes and Stampede Cranes.

With the above featuring on every construction workers’ ‘must have’ list, mobile cranes are now more important than ever.

Overhead Crane Inspection Guide

Overhead Crane Inspection Guide

Being prepared is the best way to avoid an accident, and this is especially true when it comes to overhead cranes. OSHA has found that an average of 71 crane-related fatalities happen each year. In most of these cases, an inspection could have identified the fatal problem before tragedy struck. That’s also not counting the thousands of less-serious accidents involving cranes that could have been prevented if the equipment had been subjected to the required inspection. Although these accidents may not result in the loss of life, they can result in injuries as well as serious fines for safety violations and costly downtime.

Regularly inspecting overhead crane equipment is one of the most important steps companies can take to cut down on these unfortunate crane-related incidents. However, it is crucial that operators and supervisors do more than give their equipment a quick glance to see if everything simply looks all right. Overhead crane equipment must be put through a rigorous and thorough inspection process before it can be cleared for safe crane operation. What’s more, there are dozens of inspection points that must be checked during these inspections. Additionally, certain inspection points must be checked on a more frequent basis than others, so it is essential that operators and supervisors understand OSHA’s requirements for these inspections. The following crane guide illustrates many of the most important inspection points on overhead crane equipment. By following it, companies can help ensure that their equipment and their job sites will be much safer and better prepared.

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Overhead Crane & Inspection Guidelines courtesy of Crane 1

How To Find The Right Crane

This article will teach you how to find the right crane

Almost all the industries rely heavily on cranes. They can lift and move extremely heavy objects with unreal ease. The importance of cranes cannot be denied in any way. They are extremely reliable and the success of mega projects depends heavily on cranes.

If you have the need for a crane, you need to understand the importance of selecting the right crane for yourself. To be able to do that, you need to understand the details and specific things regarding the project.

Crane Cafe is passionate about cranes and we are excited to share all the cool stuff related to cranes. An article is shared here, which is in the form of questions and answers and  will teach you how to find and pick the right crane for yourself.

Read the full article to learn more!

Following are the questions and answers that you need to know in order to select a proper crane for your project:

What Load is Being Lifted?

Loads can shift at random intervals, and they may be balanced in unusual ways. One important part of deciding which kind of crane to use is to determine what type of load you are going to move. This inquiry process needs to include both the materials inside, and the method of containing them. A liquid inside a tank is going to have dramatically different movement characteristics than a flat car trailer full of tightly packed solid objects. Exploring the entire fleet of possibilities can benefit you if you are unaware of the types of cranes available to you.

How High is the Work to Be Done?

The height of the work is going to impact how the boom is set up, as well as what kind of boom will be necessary. Furthermore, the extension of the crane’s boom can be affected by the wind, which increases exponentially as the height increases. In addition, the amount of counterweight needed to heft loads to ever-increasing heights needs to be calculated differently versus if the height is lower. Tower cranes now have dramatically higher capacity than they once did, and they can often lift over 1,000 meters into the air.

What Kinds of Obstacles are There?

In many environments, especially urban and suburban ones, cranes need to be adapted to circumventing obstacles. In addition to winds, there may be power lines, other buildings and other obstacles that can keep a crane from being able to simply raise the load directly from its origin point to its destination. In some instances, even the control scheme the crane uses can be difficult in the presence of obstacles, with pendant station cables getting caught. Radio controls may be more effective and less potentially hazardous.

How May the Crane Affect the General Public?

Just like how tower cranes are affected heavily by windy weather, the public in the area the crane is operating may be affected by this operation. If the crane’s size impacts the flow of traffic beyond a reasonable threshold, this can cause problems for the entire construction site. Further, if the crane is likely to cause issues with the operation of nearby buildings, this needs to be taken into consideration prior to selecting the type of crane you are going to use for your project.

In order to fully understand the topic, you must read the full guide on selecting the right crane published on TNT Crane & Rigging.

 

Top 7 Types of Construction Cranes

Top 7 Types Of Construction Cranes

By March 20, 2017One Comment

crane is a tower or derrick that is equipped with cables and pulleys that are used to lift and lower material. They are commonly used in the construction industry and in the manufacturing of heavy equipment. Cranes for construction are normally temporary structures, either fixed to the ground or mounted on a custom built vehicle.

They can either be controlled from an operator in a cab that travels along with the crane, by a push button pendant control station, or by radio type controls.

As with all things in construction, the crane operator is ultimately responsible for the safety of the site, the rigging crews and the working crane. To learn more about crane safety you can read more about it here and see why Eagle WestStampede and TNT Crane are committed to safety first.

So what are the different types of cranes used in construction?

Mobile Cranes

The most standard and versatile type of crane used in construction today. The mobile hydraulic crane consists of a steel truss or telescopic boom mounted on a mobile platform, which could be a rail, wheeled, or even on a cat truck. The boom is hinged at the bottom and can be either raised or lowered by cables or hydraulic cylinders.

What makes this crane so versatile is it’s footprint and mobility. In construction situations, it can sometimes be difficult to get close to where you need to hoist the materials. Moving a crane into a postition that allows it to lift the material with the correct crane capacity is effected by the footprint of the crane. The foot print is the area required to have the crane set up it’s outriggers into position that allows it to hoist the material while inside the crane chart requirements.

Mobile_Cranes

Telescopic Crane

This type of crane offers a boom that consists of a number of tubes fitted one inside of the other. A hydraulic mechanism extends or retracts the tubes to increase or decrease the length of the boom. Most cranes today are in some form a telescopic crane. Except for the lattice boom crane with is a iron constructed frame that is bolted together to get the right height for the hoist.

Telescopic_Mobile_Crane

Tower Crane

The tower crane is a modern form of a balance crane. When fixed to the ground, tower cranes will often give the best combination of height and lifting capacity and are also used when constructing tall buildings. Some large tower cranes will reach up to 1000 meters high! With an average floor dimension of a high rise equaling 3.5 meters/floor. That’s a crazy 285 story building! Pretty encredible machines. One important thing to note about tower cranes, as they construct past a specific height, it is important to have the tower crane connected to the building to help prevent crane sway and crane tipping.

Tower_crane_picture

Truck Mounted Crane (also known as boom truck or picker truck)

Cranes mounted on a rubber tire truck will provide great mobility. Outriggers that extend vertically or horizontally are used to level and stabilize the crane during hoisting. The capacity of these cranes rarely exceed 50 ton capacity. As mentioned above, their versatility is found in their mobility and reach.

Truck_Mounted_Crane_Knuckle_Boom_picture

Rough Terrain Crane

A crane that is mounted on an undercarriage with four rubber tires, designed for operations off road. The outriggers extend vertically and horizontally to level and stabilize the crane when hoisting. These types of cranes are single engine machines where the same engine is used for powering the undercarriage as it is for powering the crane. These cranes are idea for constructions sites that have uneven, dirt and rocky terrain. The mobility and ability of the crane to travel around the site make it an effect support crane for lighter hoists on highway, construction and infrastructure projects.

Rough_terrain_crane_picture

Loader Crane (also know as a folding boom crane)

loader crane is a hydraulically powered articulated arm fitted to a trailer, used to load equipment onto a trailer. The numerous sections can be folded into a small space when the crane isn’t in use. The capacity of these cranes have increased dramatically over the years. Presently there are 200 ton capacity loader (folding boom) cranes on the market today.

Loader_Crane_picture

Overhead Crane

Also refered to as a suspended crane, this type is normally used in a factory, with some of them being able to lift very heavy loads. Larger overhead cranes (also known as goliath cranes) can be found in use in shipyards and large outdoor manufacturing plants. The hoist is set on a trolley which will move in one direction along one or two beams, which move at angles to that direction along elevated or ground level tracks, often mounted along the side of an assembly area.

Overhead_Crane_picture

Cranes are incredibly powerful and interesting machines. Most people are amazed when they see a crane at work. We marvel at their ability and it is impressive to see what it can accomplish. For the construction industry, it’s an incredibly powerful (some might say) indispensable pieces of equipment used today.

We hope you enjoyed the article and if you did, please feel free to comment or share.

Celebrating 60 Years as Family Owned Crane Business

Shawnut Equipment, a leading distributor since 1957, turns 60 this year. Shawmut represents the Manitowoc Crane Group’s range of construction cranes, including Manitowoc crawler cranes, Grove rough-terrain cranes, Grove GMK all-terrain cranes, Grove hydraulic crawler cranes, Grove Yard Boss industrial cranes, National boom trucks and Potain self-erecting cranes, as well as a variety of utility equipment. Shawmut is a full-service company, with threes facilities offering sales, rentals, parts and service located in Manchester, Conn., South Easton, Mass., and Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada.

Shawmut was founded in 1957 by George O’Connell and is still run by the O’Connell family. David O’Connell, George’s son, joined the company in the 1960s and took over as president in 1960. David O’Connell’s sons, Brian and Kevin, joined the business in the early 2000s, as well as his nephew Joe Vergoni. All three of them are vice presidents and sales representatives of the company.

“Our business philosophy is to do the right thing for the customer in each and every aspect of the business,” said David O’Connell. “This is the only way to succeed. We have repeat customers who have done business with us for generations, as well as new customers who are doing business with us for the first time. We attempt to treat all customers in a fair and honest manner, whether is concerns an equipment sale, a rental a parts purchase or service work. I am extremely fortunate to have my two boys, Brian and Kevin, and my nephew Joe Vergoni deeply involved in the family business. They are learning the same business values from me that I learned from their grandfather.”

In 1963, the company became one of Grove’s first distributors, serving Connecticut and Western Massachusetts out of its Manchester, Conn., office. In 1995, Shawmut was made the exclusive dealer for the Manitowoc Company’s crawler crane line for all of New England. In the late 1990s, the company opened another full-service facility in Massachusetts to speed up response time for service and parts in the expanded territory. When Manitowoc acquired Grove Worldwide in 2002, Shawmut represented all of its product lines.

In 2008, Shawmut was awarded the territory of the Atlantic provinces of Canada. Shawmut Equipment of Canada was created and opened a facility in Saint John, New Brunswick. In now serves New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland. Shawmut is building an additional facility in Elmsdale, Nova Scotia.

In 2014, Shawmut started offering utility equipment sales and rentals, as well as the support required for these machines. It supplies Terex TM Hi-Ranger tracked material handling buckets, Terex General digger derricks, tracked National cranes and Morooka rubber track carriers.

“This transition was very organic for Shawmut,” said Vergoni. “We had already been providing utility contractors with cranes, so when they started to ask us to provide additional utility equipment, we felt it was a great opportunity for our company. At the time of our utility equipment expansion, major utility projects such as the Maine Power Reliability Program, New England East West Solution and Maritime Link were under way with the Northern Pass on the horizon.”

About Crane Cafe: We are a group of crane buffs that are committed to delivering crane tips, crane safety tips and more. Promoting crane services Edmonton, crane services Vancouver and Crane Services Calgary. Enjoy!

Know These Things Before Getting LED Light Bars

know these things before buying led light bars

You must know these things before buying LED light bars

LED light bars are the best lighting solution for your industrial needs. They provide the best lighting solution there is, giving you the satisfaction and ease of working at night, as if you were working during the day.

Other than giving the best experience for work, LED driving lights are the best for your off-road vehicles, ATVs and motorcycles. Never leave the home at night without these amazing friends, for they will guide you along the way, and that too with perfection.

Crane Cafe cares about your safety deeply and that is one of the reasons that we’ve provided an informative article here that describes different things that you need to know before buying LED light bars.

Read the complete article to learn more!

Lumens, not watts

Forget what you know about incandescent lamps — your watts are no good here.

When shopping for bulbs, you’re probably accustomed to looking for watts, an indication of how bright the bulb will be. The brightness of LEDs, however, is determined a little differently.

Contrary to common belief, wattage isn’t an indication of brightness, but a measurement of how much energy the bulb draws. For incandescent lamps, there is an accepted correlation between the watts drawn and the brightness, but for LEDs, watts aren’t a great predictor of how bright the bulb will be. (The point, after all, is that they draw less energy.)

You’ll pay more for an LED light bar

LED light bars are like hybrid cars: cheaper to operate but pricey upfront.

When switching to LED light bars, don’t expect to save buckets of cash. Instead, think of it as an investment. Luckily, competition has increased and LED light bars have come down in price but you should still expect to pay much more than an incandescent light.

Eventually, the LED light bars will pay off, and in the meantime, you’ll enjoy less heat production and longer lifespan.

The complete article describing the various things that you need to learn before getting LED light bars will explain everything in detail.

A Good Guide For Crane Operator Hand Signals

Crane operator hand signal guide

A Guide explaining different hand signals for crane operators

Cranes are extremely important for all industries. Be it construction, production,  car manufacturing or cargo industry, cranes are an essential and inalienable part of the industry.

Operators need to be attentive, vigilant and cautious while operating the cranes. Although, accidents can not be completely avoided but they can be mitigated and the best way to do it is by being careful.

Safety should be the primary concern in all the industries and there should be no compromise on incorporating the safe practices. Crane Cafe is aimed at presenting you the best quality content. With that spirit,  presented here is an article which highlights the importance of hand signals in operating the crane safely. The article also explains various hand signals and their meanings.

Read the complete article to get this valuable information!

The definitions and explanation regarding different hand signals for crane operators are as follows:

Hoist

To hoist, or raise the load, the signaler stands with his/her right arm bent 90 degrees upward. From there, the signaler points his/her finger upward and and turns it around from the elbow in a counter-clockwise motion.

Lower

Lowering the load is where the signaler places his/her right arm pointing straight downward to the side by the hip, points the finger off to the right, and turns the finger around from the elbow in a counter-clockwise fashion.

Raise Boom

To raise the boom, the signaler begins with the right arm outstretched to the side. From there, the signaler points the thumb upward.

Lower Boom

To lower the boom is the reversal of the signal to raise the boom. The signaler begins with the right arm outstretched to the side. From there, they point their thumb downwards.

Dog Everything

Dog everything, or pause, can be useful if the situation changes, if there is a need for further instructions, or if there is the potential for danger. The signal for dog everything is to place the signaler’s hands clasped in front of the stomach.

Stop

To signal stop, the signaler bends his/her elbow with the upper arm extended, palm down, and rhythmically extends and retracts their hand to a fully extended arm out to the side. Emergency stop is the same, only with both arms.

The information relating to other hand signals for crane operators can be obtained by accessing the brilliantly written article on TNT Crane & Rigging. Read the complete article to obtain the information and spread to your crane operators and workers.