How To Find The Right Crane

This article will teach you how to find the right crane

Almost all the industries rely heavily on cranes. They can lift and move extremely heavy objects with unreal ease. The importance of cranes cannot be denied in any way. They are extremely reliable and the success of mega projects depends heavily on cranes.

If you have the need for a crane, you need to understand the importance of selecting the right crane for yourself. To be able to do that, you need to understand the details and specific things regarding the project.

Crane Cafe is passionate about cranes and we are excited to share all the cool stuff related to cranes. An article is shared here, which is in the form of questions and answers and  will teach you how to find and pick the right crane for yourself.

Read the full article to learn more!

Following are the questions and answers that you need to know in order to select a proper crane for your project:

What Load is Being Lifted?

Loads can shift at random intervals, and they may be balanced in unusual ways. One important part of deciding which kind of crane to use is to determine what type of load you are going to move. This inquiry process needs to include both the materials inside, and the method of containing them. A liquid inside a tank is going to have dramatically different movement characteristics than a flat car trailer full of tightly packed solid objects. Exploring the entire fleet of possibilities can benefit you if you are unaware of the types of cranes available to you.

How High is the Work to Be Done?

The height of the work is going to impact how the boom is set up, as well as what kind of boom will be necessary. Furthermore, the extension of the crane’s boom can be affected by the wind, which increases exponentially as the height increases. In addition, the amount of counterweight needed to heft loads to ever-increasing heights needs to be calculated differently versus if the height is lower. Tower cranes now have dramatically higher capacity than they once did, and they can often lift over 1,000 meters into the air.

What Kinds of Obstacles are There?

In many environments, especially urban and suburban ones, cranes need to be adapted to circumventing obstacles. In addition to winds, there may be power lines, other buildings and other obstacles that can keep a crane from being able to simply raise the load directly from its origin point to its destination. In some instances, even the control scheme the crane uses can be difficult in the presence of obstacles, with pendant station cables getting caught. Radio controls may be more effective and less potentially hazardous.

How May the Crane Affect the General Public?

Just like how tower cranes are affected heavily by windy weather, the public in the area the crane is operating may be affected by this operation. If the crane’s size impacts the flow of traffic beyond a reasonable threshold, this can cause problems for the entire construction site. Further, if the crane is likely to cause issues with the operation of nearby buildings, this needs to be taken into consideration prior to selecting the type of crane you are going to use for your project.

In order to fully understand the topic, you must read the full guide on selecting the right crane published on TNT Crane & Rigging.

 

Top 7 Types of Construction Cranes

Top 7 Types Of Construction Cranes

By March 20, 2017One Comment

crane is a tower or derrick that is equipped with cables and pulleys that are used to lift and lower material. They are commonly used in the construction industry and in the manufacturing of heavy equipment. Cranes for construction are normally temporary structures, either fixed to the ground or mounted on a custom built vehicle.

They can either be controlled from an operator in a cab that travels along with the crane, by a push button pendant control station, or by radio type controls.

As with all things in construction, the crane operator is ultimately responsible for the safety of the site, the rigging crews and the working crane. To learn more about crane safety you can read more about it here and see why Eagle WestStampede and TNT Crane are committed to safety first.

So what are the different types of cranes used in construction?

Mobile Cranes

The most standard and versatile type of crane used in construction today. The mobile hydraulic crane consists of a steel truss or telescopic boom mounted on a mobile platform, which could be a rail, wheeled, or even on a cat truck. The boom is hinged at the bottom and can be either raised or lowered by cables or hydraulic cylinders.

What makes this crane so versatile is it’s footprint and mobility. In construction situations, it can sometimes be difficult to get close to where you need to hoist the materials. Moving a crane into a postition that allows it to lift the material with the correct crane capacity is effected by the footprint of the crane. The foot print is the area required to have the crane set up it’s outriggers into position that allows it to hoist the material while inside the crane chart requirements.

Mobile_Cranes

Telescopic Crane

This type of crane offers a boom that consists of a number of tubes fitted one inside of the other. A hydraulic mechanism extends or retracts the tubes to increase or decrease the length of the boom. Most cranes today are in some form a telescopic crane. Except for the lattice boom crane with is a iron constructed frame that is bolted together to get the right height for the hoist.

Telescopic_Mobile_Crane

Tower Crane

The tower crane is a modern form of a balance crane. When fixed to the ground, tower cranes will often give the best combination of height and lifting capacity and are also used when constructing tall buildings. Some large tower cranes will reach up to 1000 meters high! With an average floor dimension of a high rise equaling 3.5 meters/floor. That’s a crazy 285 story building! Pretty encredible machines. One important thing to note about tower cranes, as they construct past a specific height, it is important to have the tower crane connected to the building to help prevent crane sway and crane tipping.

Tower_crane_picture

Truck Mounted Crane (also known as boom truck or picker truck)

Cranes mounted on a rubber tire truck will provide great mobility. Outriggers that extend vertically or horizontally are used to level and stabilize the crane during hoisting. The capacity of these cranes rarely exceed 50 ton capacity. As mentioned above, their versatility is found in their mobility and reach.

Truck_Mounted_Crane_Knuckle_Boom_picture

Rough Terrain Crane

A crane that is mounted on an undercarriage with four rubber tires, designed for operations off road. The outriggers extend vertically and horizontally to level and stabilize the crane when hoisting. These types of cranes are single engine machines where the same engine is used for powering the undercarriage as it is for powering the crane. These cranes are idea for constructions sites that have uneven, dirt and rocky terrain. The mobility and ability of the crane to travel around the site make it an effect support crane for lighter hoists on highway, construction and infrastructure projects.

Rough_terrain_crane_picture

Loader Crane (also know as a folding boom crane)

loader crane is a hydraulically powered articulated arm fitted to a trailer, used to load equipment onto a trailer. The numerous sections can be folded into a small space when the crane isn’t in use. The capacity of these cranes have increased dramatically over the years. Presently there are 200 ton capacity loader (folding boom) cranes on the market today.

Loader_Crane_picture

Overhead Crane

Also refered to as a suspended crane, this type is normally used in a factory, with some of them being able to lift very heavy loads. Larger overhead cranes (also known as goliath cranes) can be found in use in shipyards and large outdoor manufacturing plants. The hoist is set on a trolley which will move in one direction along one or two beams, which move at angles to that direction along elevated or ground level tracks, often mounted along the side of an assembly area.

Overhead_Crane_picture

Cranes are incredibly powerful and interesting machines. Most people are amazed when they see a crane at work. We marvel at their ability and it is impressive to see what it can accomplish. For the construction industry, it’s an incredibly powerful (some might say) indispensable pieces of equipment used today.

We hope you enjoyed the article and if you did, please feel free to comment or share.

Celebrating 60 Years as Family Owned Crane Business

Shawnut Equipment, a leading distributor since 1957, turns 60 this year. Shawmut represents the Manitowoc Crane Group’s range of construction cranes, including Manitowoc crawler cranes, Grove rough-terrain cranes, Grove GMK all-terrain cranes, Grove hydraulic crawler cranes, Grove Yard Boss industrial cranes, National boom trucks and Potain self-erecting cranes, as well as a variety of utility equipment. Shawmut is a full-service company, with threes facilities offering sales, rentals, parts and service located in Manchester, Conn., South Easton, Mass., and Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada.

Shawmut was founded in 1957 by George O’Connell and is still run by the O’Connell family. David O’Connell, George’s son, joined the company in the 1960s and took over as president in 1960. David O’Connell’s sons, Brian and Kevin, joined the business in the early 2000s, as well as his nephew Joe Vergoni. All three of them are vice presidents and sales representatives of the company.

“Our business philosophy is to do the right thing for the customer in each and every aspect of the business,” said David O’Connell. “This is the only way to succeed. We have repeat customers who have done business with us for generations, as well as new customers who are doing business with us for the first time. We attempt to treat all customers in a fair and honest manner, whether is concerns an equipment sale, a rental a parts purchase or service work. I am extremely fortunate to have my two boys, Brian and Kevin, and my nephew Joe Vergoni deeply involved in the family business. They are learning the same business values from me that I learned from their grandfather.”

In 1963, the company became one of Grove’s first distributors, serving Connecticut and Western Massachusetts out of its Manchester, Conn., office. In 1995, Shawmut was made the exclusive dealer for the Manitowoc Company’s crawler crane line for all of New England. In the late 1990s, the company opened another full-service facility in Massachusetts to speed up response time for service and parts in the expanded territory. When Manitowoc acquired Grove Worldwide in 2002, Shawmut represented all of its product lines.

In 2008, Shawmut was awarded the territory of the Atlantic provinces of Canada. Shawmut Equipment of Canada was created and opened a facility in Saint John, New Brunswick. In now serves New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland. Shawmut is building an additional facility in Elmsdale, Nova Scotia.

In 2014, Shawmut started offering utility equipment sales and rentals, as well as the support required for these machines. It supplies Terex TM Hi-Ranger tracked material handling buckets, Terex General digger derricks, tracked National cranes and Morooka rubber track carriers.

“This transition was very organic for Shawmut,” said Vergoni. “We had already been providing utility contractors with cranes, so when they started to ask us to provide additional utility equipment, we felt it was a great opportunity for our company. At the time of our utility equipment expansion, major utility projects such as the Maine Power Reliability Program, New England East West Solution and Maritime Link were under way with the Northern Pass on the horizon.”

About Crane Cafe: We are a group of crane buffs that are committed to delivering crane tips, crane safety tips and more. Promoting crane services Edmonton, crane services Vancouver and Crane Services Calgary. Enjoy!

Know These Things Before Getting LED Light Bars

know these things before buying led light bars

You must know these things before buying LED light bars

LED light bars are the best lighting solution for your industrial needs. They provide the best lighting solution there is, giving you the satisfaction and ease of working at night, as if you were working during the day.

Other than giving the best experience for work, LED driving lights are the best for your off-road vehicles, ATVs and motorcycles. Never leave the home at night without these amazing friends, for they will guide you along the way, and that too with perfection.

Crane Cafe cares about your safety deeply and that is one of the reasons that we’ve provided an informative article here that describes different things that you need to know before buying LED light bars.

Read the complete article to learn more!

Lumens, not watts

Forget what you know about incandescent lamps — your watts are no good here.

When shopping for bulbs, you’re probably accustomed to looking for watts, an indication of how bright the bulb will be. The brightness of LEDs, however, is determined a little differently.

Contrary to common belief, wattage isn’t an indication of brightness, but a measurement of how much energy the bulb draws. For incandescent lamps, there is an accepted correlation between the watts drawn and the brightness, but for LEDs, watts aren’t a great predictor of how bright the bulb will be. (The point, after all, is that they draw less energy.)

You’ll pay more for an LED light bar

LED light bars are like hybrid cars: cheaper to operate but pricey upfront.

When switching to LED light bars, don’t expect to save buckets of cash. Instead, think of it as an investment. Luckily, competition has increased and LED light bars have come down in price but you should still expect to pay much more than an incandescent light.

Eventually, the LED light bars will pay off, and in the meantime, you’ll enjoy less heat production and longer lifespan.

The complete article describing the various things that you need to learn before getting LED light bars will explain everything in detail.

A Good Guide For Crane Operator Hand Signals

Crane operator hand signal guide

A Guide explaining different hand signals for crane operators

Cranes are extremely important for all industries. Be it construction, production,  car manufacturing or cargo industry, cranes are an essential and inalienable part of the industry.

Operators need to be attentive, vigilant and cautious while operating the cranes. Although, accidents can not be completely avoided but they can be mitigated and the best way to do it is by being careful.

Safety should be the primary concern in all the industries and there should be no compromise on incorporating the safe practices. Crane Cafe is aimed at presenting you the best quality content. With that spirit,  presented here is an article which highlights the importance of hand signals in operating the crane safely. The article also explains various hand signals and their meanings.

Read the complete article to get this valuable information!

The definitions and explanation regarding different hand signals for crane operators are as follows:

Hoist

To hoist, or raise the load, the signaler stands with his/her right arm bent 90 degrees upward. From there, the signaler points his/her finger upward and and turns it around from the elbow in a counter-clockwise motion.

Lower

Lowering the load is where the signaler places his/her right arm pointing straight downward to the side by the hip, points the finger off to the right, and turns the finger around from the elbow in a counter-clockwise fashion.

Raise Boom

To raise the boom, the signaler begins with the right arm outstretched to the side. From there, the signaler points the thumb upward.

Lower Boom

To lower the boom is the reversal of the signal to raise the boom. The signaler begins with the right arm outstretched to the side. From there, they point their thumb downwards.

Dog Everything

Dog everything, or pause, can be useful if the situation changes, if there is a need for further instructions, or if there is the potential for danger. The signal for dog everything is to place the signaler’s hands clasped in front of the stomach.

Stop

To signal stop, the signaler bends his/her elbow with the upper arm extended, palm down, and rhythmically extends and retracts their hand to a fully extended arm out to the side. Emergency stop is the same, only with both arms.

The information relating to other hand signals for crane operators can be obtained by accessing the brilliantly written article on TNT Crane & Rigging. Read the complete article to obtain the information and spread to your crane operators and workers.

33 Ton Crane at Work

33 Ton Stiff Boom Crane Hoisting Tubing Injector

The City of Medicine Hat request the service of Stampede Crane & Rigging Ltd., a division of TNT Crane Canada with crane services Edmonton AB, to hoist a tubing machine to support Maple Creek Endless Tubing for a recent project in Medicine Hat. Maple Creek Endless Tubing injector weighed 5000 lb. and was hoisted by Stampede Crane’s 33 ton crane for the project.

Project: Hoisting a 5000 lb. tubing injector

Customer: Holding Maple Creek Endless Tubing & City of Medicine Hat Gas

Location: Medicine Hat AB

Equipment: 33 Ton Stiff Boom Crane & Tubing Injector/Lubricator

33 Ton Stiff Boom Crane

More About Maple Creek Endless Tubing

Maple Creek Endless Tubing Services Ltd. is a vibrant privately owned coil tubing services company at the forefront of the oil and gas servicing industry.

With more than 25 years in the coil tubing well servicing sector, Maple Creek Endless Tubing has strived to be a leader in the industry with its technological advances, stringent maintenance schedules, and dedication to keeping up to the highest standards known in the industry.

With its highly-skilled and competently trained workforce, 15 active rigs, and 3 field offices, Maple Creek Endless Tubing became recognized as one of the industry bests and will continue to up-hold its reputation as such.

Stampede Crane & Rigging is a division of TNT Crane & Rigging Canada.

New Crane Training Facility in Calgary AB

SAIT breaks ground on new facility 

A rendering of the future SAIT trades training facility in southeast Calgary.

The Southern Alberta Institute of Technology (SAIT) which celebrated its centennial on Oct. 16, marked another historic milestone today — breaking ground on the first new training facility of its second century.The customized training facility will be constructed on an eight-acre lot at 10490-72 St. SE, Calgary. When completed in the fall of 2017, the facility will house world-class applied learning labs for Crane and Hoisting Equipment Operator Apprenticeship and Iron Worker Apprenticeship programs.

“This new facility will dramatically enhance the learning environment for SAIT students and will include the best technology available, from crane simulators to a full crane maintenance shop, to labs designed specifically for ironworkers,” says Dr. David Ross, SAIT President and CEO. “By providing real-world experience, coupled with robust industry-specific academic programs, we will set our students up for success so our future crane operators and iron workers are job-ready and able to make a contribution to employers as soon as they graduate.”

Construction is now underway and will employ hundreds of workers start to finish. Alberta Advanced Education is providing $5 million in operating funding for the facility.

“This government is proud to support our post-secondary institutions, because we know good jobs begin with a good education. This new facility will provide innovative training opportunities to prepare Albertans for success as we build on traditional economic drivers and move towards a more diverse economy,” said Marlin Schmidt, Minister of Advanced Education.

(Left to right) Dr. David Ross, SAIT President & CEO, Wayne Benz, President at Centron Construction Group, Graham Sucha, MLA Calgary-Shaw and David Roberge, Dean of SAIT's School of Manufacturing and Automation break ground at SAIT's new trades training facility.

(Left to right) Dr. David Ross, SAIT President & CEO, Wayne Benz, President at Centron Construction Group, Graham Sucha, MLA Calgary-Shaw and David Roberge, Dean of SAIT’s School of Manufacturing and Automation break ground at SAIT’s new trades training facility.

Stampede Crane & Rigging is a division of TNT Crane Canada. All rights reserved.