A Good Guide For Crane Operator Hand Signals

Crane operator hand signal guide

A Guide explaining different hand signals for crane operators

Cranes are extremely important for all industries. Be it construction, production,  car manufacturing or cargo industry, cranes are an essential and inalienable part of the industry.

Operators need to be attentive, vigilant and cautious while operating the cranes. Although, accidents can not be completely avoided but they can be mitigated and the best way to do it is by being careful.

Safety should be the primary concern in all the industries and there should be no compromise on incorporating the safe practices. Crane Cafe is aimed at presenting you the best quality content. With that spirit,  presented here is an article which highlights the importance of hand signals in operating the crane safely. The article also explains various hand signals and their meanings.

Read the complete article to get this valuable information!

The definitions and explanation regarding different hand signals for crane operators are as follows:

Hoist

To hoist, or raise the load, the signaler stands with his/her right arm bent 90 degrees upward. From there, the signaler points his/her finger upward and and turns it around from the elbow in a counter-clockwise motion.

Lower

Lowering the load is where the signaler places his/her right arm pointing straight downward to the side by the hip, points the finger off to the right, and turns the finger around from the elbow in a counter-clockwise fashion.

Raise Boom

To raise the boom, the signaler begins with the right arm outstretched to the side. From there, the signaler points the thumb upward.

Lower Boom

To lower the boom is the reversal of the signal to raise the boom. The signaler begins with the right arm outstretched to the side. From there, they point their thumb downwards.

Dog Everything

Dog everything, or pause, can be useful if the situation changes, if there is a need for further instructions, or if there is the potential for danger. The signal for dog everything is to place the signaler’s hands clasped in front of the stomach.

Stop

To signal stop, the signaler bends his/her elbow with the upper arm extended, palm down, and rhythmically extends and retracts their hand to a fully extended arm out to the side. Emergency stop is the same, only with both arms.

The information relating to other hand signals for crane operators can be obtained by accessing the brilliantly written article on TNT Crane & Rigging. Read the complete article to obtain the information and spread to your crane operators and workers.

News Update on Crane Fatality in England

Falcon Tower Cranes, the company whose crane was involved in a fatal accident in Crewe, England, has issued a statement naming the victims, who it describes as highly regarded and popular members of staff. The company separately named the make and model of the crane involved.

Falcon’s statement says, “Rhys Barker and David Newall were highly regarded and popular members of our staff. Their deaths were untimely and deeply regretted by all their friends and colleagues who wish to express their deepest and sincere condolences to their family and friends. Our thoughts go out to their families whose welfare is uppermost at this difficult time.

“We also share our deepest concern for those who were injured and we wish David Webb a speedy and complete recovery.  We consider health and safety to be of paramount importance and we have taken every step to ensure that all procedures are conducted as safely and efficiently as possible.

“We will leave no stone unturned to establish what went wrong and we will co-operate fully with all authorities to understand fully the causes of this tragic accident and to learn all safety lessons to be sure that safety remains of paramount importance.”

Separately, we found through sources that the crane involved was a Potain MC85B city crane.

All of us at Crane Cafe send our deepest condolences to the families of the men who died and a speedy recovery to the person who was injured.

How Working at Night Can Create a Safer Jobsite

Today, highway construction in urban areas is almost always performed at night. State Departments of Transportation (DOTs) around the country have discovered that night jobsites are safer and more efficient for a number of reasons.

  • Roadways can be closed at night without major public inconvenience.
  • Traffic is not an issue.
  • Worksites can be expanded.
  • Cranes have more space in which to operate and swing.

Working at night

OSHA and DOTs have developed comprehensive safety measures for nighttime jobsites, and modern construction lighting systems create a work environment that is as luminous as working in daylight. Crane-owning companies are adjusting to the increase in nighttime work, and crane manufacturers are looking for ways to adapt cranes to these conditions.

At ConExpo in March 2014, Link-Belt introduced its first crane with a standard lighting package, the 210-ton capacity ATC-3210. The lighting package on the new all-terrain crane makes it easier to set up and rig the crane in the dark hours of the early morning or dusk. There are high intensity LED lights on the front of the operator’s cab and at the outriggers. The engine bay now has lighting as do the ground control stations for outriggers and suspension. Other optional lighting includes high intensity work lights above the operator’s cab, lights that illuminate the walkways on the upper, a right-side, forward-facing high intensity work light and left and right high-intensity work lights mounted atop the upper to illuminate the swing area. Plus, remote-controlled single and dual boom floodlight options are available.

Albuquerque, NM-based Crane Service Inc. recently took delivery of a new Link-Belt ATC-3210 and has already seen the value in the new lighting package, according to Bob Warianka, business development manager.

While his company doesn’t do that much night work, he said it is becoming more prevalent. Warianka pointed to a recent job that involved the company’s ATC-3210 and ATC-3275 setting bridge girders at night.

“The contractor had the job lit up really well, with four light plants illuminating the work area of each crane,” he said.

While the crane’s lighting package isn’t really a factor in lighting up the worksite, it’s still a great convenience for rigging the crane.

Rigging asset

“The lights are really an asset when you are rigging the crane or setting it up in the early morning hours, or sometimes we will assemble a crane at night,” Warianka said. “We envision more crane companies offering better lighting packages in the future. I can see them being used on rough terrain cranes too.”

He said crawlers cranes would be the least likely cranes to be equipped with comprehensive lighting packages because the type of work they do at night generally involves a well-lit jobsite, and rigging a crawler is different than rigging a mobile crane.

“Tower cranes have lights on them,” said Warianka. “Tower cranes are sometimes on a job working 24 hours a day and two shifts. With mobile cranes, we can see a need for a lighting package for the short days of winter or when you want to keep working at dusk or during cloudy weather. These lights will also come in handy when doing concrete pours, like on a high-rise job. Sometimes concrete pours go into the night or start early in the morning. The lights you use on a crane will be job specific.”

Remote controls

In a few cases, Crane Service has provided lighting equipment, for instance when the crane might be grabbing on and needs to be tied to the load for a while.

He has been impressed with the remote-controlled lights on the new ATC-3210.

“The light on the boom can be operated by remote control so that you can actually rotate the light and spotlight something below the crane,” he said.

Rick Curnutte, product manager, telescopic truck and all-terrain cranes, Link-Belt, said the driving factor for the lighting package was lighting the jobsite, but for set up and tear down of the crane.

“People in our industry tell us what they want to see on a crane and we try to listen,” said Curnutte. “In order to beat traffic, cranes are being dispatched much earlier to the jobsite, and to be there in a timely manner, crews are often setting up the crane in the dark.”

Rigging a crane at night without big jobsite lighting systems means the crane owner will have to bring out his own lighting system. With a crane lighting package, the rigging is much easier.

Curnutte said that not having a lighting package makes it difficult to lay down mats and perform the ordinary challenges of rigging the crane in darkness.

Customer feedback has been positive, especially the remote control boom lights and the engine bay lights that allow the operator and rigger to check the oil and provide maintenance to the crane.

“There are lighting packages for looking down at loads on the boom and cab lighting, but I don’t think anyone has gone to the extent that Link-Belt has gone to,” Curnutte said.

While the new lighting package from Link-Belt has only been out for a few months, crane lighting has become a topic of discussion for customers, he said.

“It’s still early and there’s been a lot of discussion. How far we take it down the product line is going to depend on the demand we see. Definitely for the ATs it’s been a hit and the ATC-3275 will get the same lighting package as the ATC-3210. This idea definitely struck a chord when we showed it at ConExpo.”

Again, Curnutte stressed that Link-Belt’s goal with its crane lighting package is not to provide lighting for the jobsite lifting.

“There are some aspects of lighting we did that do benefit the jobsite, but you have to be cautious about using some of those lights during lifting because you have ground personnel who need to be able to look at the operator in the cab, and you don’t want the light affecting their vision or ability to see what they need to see. But generally, we feel like we’ve hit a home run with this lighting package.”

Author; D.Ann Shiffler

Source:

http://www.khl.com/magazines/american-cranes-and-transport/detail/item98603/A-bright-idea?source=breaking-news

Recent Use of Zoomlion Tower Cranes to Erect the Astana Expo 2017

With the recent Expo 2017 coming to Astana, Zoomlion placed and used multiple tower cranes to erect the pavilions main buildings.

The building has a diameter of 80m and a height of 100m, with pavilions of other countries evenly distributed around it in a ring shape.

Twelve large-tonnage Zoomlion tower cranes, seven Zoomlion truck cranes and one Zoomlion bulldozer have participated in the pavilion construction.  “Among which four Zoomlion D1100-63, the super-large tower cranes with the maximum hoisting capacity in the Central Asia,” said the manufacturer.

The D1100-63 is a new model of self-climbing tower crane, featuring superstructure slewing, double lifting points, level jib and horizontal trolleying. With a hoisting capacity of 9.8t at the 80m jib end, the tower crane adopts variable frequency stepless speed-regulating motor to significantly optimize the system’s running stability and improve positioning accuracy.  PLC (programmable logical controller) is used to control all actions.

The event will take place between June 10 and September 10, 2017.

This was the second time that Zoomlion has been involved in Expo construction, having helped to build the Chinese Pavilion in Expo 2015 Milano.

Zoomlion said: “The direct economic and trade cooperation and cultural exchanges between China and Kazakhstan are of far-reaching significance to promote the development of the “Belt and Road” [Chinese government-backed investment and trade strategy]. As a leading enterprise in the engineering machinery industry, Zoomlion has explored the market in Kazakhstan for over ten years, dedicated to efficiently helping the construction of local infrastructures.”

About the author: Crane Cafe is an organization connected to the crane industry to provide crane, crane operation and crane safety tips.

Overhead Crane Hazards and Ways To Prevent Them

overhead crane hazards and their prevention

Hazards With Overhead Cranes and Their Prevention

Cranes are absolutely amazing machines. They have now become an essential part of all the industries. Overhead cranes, specifically are used in the manufacturing and construction industries. With machines, we need to be careful because any careless act can cause serious accidents and injuries. Similarly, there are hazards associated with overhead cranes as well. However, with proper planning and careful management, these hazards can be minimized. This article provides some excellent ways to prevent the dangers associated with overhead cranes.

Read the complete article to learn more about overhead crane dangers and how to prevent them!

Some Common Overhead Crane Hazards and Tips On How to Prevent Them

Preventing Crane Hazards: In any type of industry, the coming together of anticipation and pro-actively handling problems is something, which does result in greater success than just reactively responding to incidents. If an individual works in the world of construction and manufacturing, there are hazards always present at job sites, but with proper training and preparation ahead for them, a lot of issues can be prevented.

In order to keep all those involved safe, all operators and workers need to understand the most basic of all safety hazards, and how to recognize any of them right away. Please read on to learn more about the many potential risks that are a part of overhead cranes and the accompanying preventable measures.

Crane Overloading

When a crane exceeds over its operational capacity, it can also prove to be the very thing, which tends to cause about 80% of all crane accidents and structural failures as well. The overloading of the crane’s operational capacity is caused by some of the following:

  • The presence of swinging or a sudden dropping of any load
  • Any defective components
  • The hoisting of a load that is beyond its normal capacity
  • The dragging of a load
  • Whenever side-loading a boom

Any Materials Falling

One of the best ways to lessen the chance of any materials falling down from cranes is clear. It is to make sure to perform regular maintenance of hoists. An example of this is to do load testing maintenance to ensure that you know how many pounds a hoist can handle exactly. It also will provide an accurate indication of just how well the hoist is functioning currently. Another way to reduce the chance of mechanical failure is by performing inspections of the crane each day. If, and when, a potential problem is identified by the operators, they need to make sure to implement the lockout/tag-out procedure.

Here at TNT Crane Service, Inc., we always make sure to put safety and prevention first. It is our number one priority. Because of this fact, we ensure that all the machines we have are kept well maintained and up to date. What this does is ensures that you will be getting the most effective, as well as, the most reliable equipment that is available. Please view the equipment that we have on hand for sale or rental today. It may help you to find the crane that you require for your next major project coming up.

The complete article can be accessed by visiting the link here.