New Wire Rope Standard in the Works

New Wire Rope Standard in the Works

A proposed engineering standard for wire rope for cranes will have separate chapters for steel and synthetic ropes, a member of the committee working on the standard told a crane and rigging conference in Edmonton last fall.

At the time, Bill Fronzaglia expected the new standard, called ASME B30.30, would be approved by a ballot at a subcommittee meeting in January. However, according to a June 2016 public schedule from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, which develops the ASME standards, the B30.30 wire rope standard was still under development. And an agenda item from an ASME B30 standards committee meeting held in Houston in May 2016 noted that the ballot on the rope standards draft had been withdrawn. That was because of “the extent of the changes to the document” in evaluating comments.

The subcommittee planned a final review of a revised document after the May main committee meeting and anticipated “resubmitting a new first ballot shortly afterward.”

Deborah Wetzel, the society’s manager of media relations, confirmed by email in July that the B30.30 standard was still under development and had not just been approved by the B30 standards committee. Once that approval takes place, the public will have a chance to review the standard and submit comments during a public review process that will be announced on the ASME website at https://cstools.asme.org.

“Since our standards are developed under a consensus process, we are unable to predict when the committee will reach consensus on this new volume,” Wetzel said, adding that “a timeline for approval/publication is not available at this time.”

Of the 29 existing ASME B30 standards, “16 are incorporated into Canadian provincial and territorial regulations,” according to an August 2014 report of the Standards Council of Canada on hoisting and rigging regulations in Canada. However, none of the ASME B30 standards are incorporated into any federal Canadian regulations. As of August 2014, B.C. had incorporated 13 ASME B30 standards, the most of any Canadian jurisdiction. Yukon had incorporated 12, Nova Scotia, 10 Manitoba 6, and Newfoundland two. None of the other provinces or territories had incorporated any.

In Europe, the situation with synthetic rope is more complicated than in the U.S., Fronzaglia said. The European Union has a machinery directive that for a piece of equipment that doesn’t have a standard, a manufacturer can create a technical file and show evidence that it works and is safe, Fronzaglia said. That enables the manufacturer to place a CE mark on the product, such as on a high-performance sling.

However, the European Federation of Material Handling has met with major crane manufacturers to develop a standard “in a short period of time” that won’t be legally binding but will act as a guideline.

And the International Standards Organization in a meeting of Technical Committee 96’s subcommittee SC 3 redefined wire rope for cranes as applying to ropes “regardless of their material properties,” Fronzaglia said.

Basically that means the committee acknowledged the need to develop a synthetic crane rope standard, he added.

For all of us at TNT Crane, we realize that this is an integral part of crane safety.

Use Cranes In A Safe Manner

Use Cranes In A Safe Manner

How to perform the safe operation of cranes? Cranes have made a lot of things easier. In order to operate cranessuccessfully and efficiently, the safety considerations need to be taken into account. The safety of the persons operating the crane as well as the all others around it is of prime importance. Following are some tips which can be followed to ensure the safe operation of cranes:

License:

Obtaining the license of crane operation is the first thing that all the crane operators must do. The National Commission for the Certification of Crane Operators (NCCCO) handles the standards for crane operator certificates. Crane operators must prove their knowledge of efficient crane operation by obtaining the certification.

Mobile Crane Computer:

You should never override the computer of the mobile crane.

Be Mindful of Your Surroundings:

Be aware and alert about your surroundings. Be watchful and observe all overhead hazards, including power lines and nearby buildings.

Create a checklist before operation:

Prepare an operating manual which includes all the steps and safety procedures of the crane operation, along with a checklist. The checklist should include:

  • Checking hoist
  • Examination of loading chain
  • The place and positions of hooks

Ground Conditions:

Ensure that your mobile crane can easily be supported and safely operated on the site.

Pads and Cribbing:

Ensure that appropriate pads or cribbing are being used.

Don’t Ignore The Safe Working Load (SWL):

One can easily make a mistake of thinking to lift more than the SWL of the crane, which can be a really hazardous task. The definition of SWL is self-explanatory – the crane cannot lift more than that safely. Make sure that all the operators are using the right sized crane, sling and equipment for the current job.

No Slack Chains:

It does not matter if your workers are fresh or highly experienced, they should not operate the crane just based on their instincts as it can be very risky. The chain or wire must be taut and firm before lifting any load. The operators must ensure:

  • Never run the hook with a slack chain
  • The chain or wire must never be bent on sharp edges
  • If they see any damaged chain or wire, they must immediately report it

Oil and Fluid Levels:

Before staring the crane, ensure that there is sufficient gas, oil and any other type of required fluid.

Other Safety Precautions:

Indeed, even with all of the safety precautions, there is still a chance that accidents may happen and it is essential that you know what steps to take in case of an accident. Take all the necessary precautions like ensuring that the proper attire and safety equipment are worn by the operators.

Ensure that all the personnel are properly trained to handle an emergency situation so that the risks and problems may be minimized in case of an incident.

Conclusion:

Operating cranes with proper safety precautions can make the workplace safer and the work more efficient. Make sure that all the operators are licensed to operate the cranes in order to have a great working place with a safe atmosphere.

What is a mobile crane?

What is a mobile crane?

Technology has advanced to the point that mobile cranes can lift and move just about anything your heart desires, in a wide range of different situations. From carefully squeezing a kitchen sink in through a skylight window, to moving a grand piano from one floor to the next, there is little a mobile crane can’t take on. As a consequence, they come in all sorts of shapes, sizes and heights.

In fact, their versatility is such that it can be hard to keep track of what kind of mobile crane is required. Below, we pick apart the most common.

TNT Crane Canada Crawler Crane

Crawler Cranes: Working in partnership with telescopic and lattice booms, crawler cranes are self-propelled cranes on tracks. They are incredibly powerful machines that range from 90 to 1200 ton in capacity. Typically crawler cranes are used in bridge construction, concrete tilt up and wind farm installation projects.

tnt crane and rigging 500 ton all terrain crane

 

All Terrain Cranes: As the name suggests, this type of crane is an all wheel drive crane that can travel on both highways and gravel roads to get the crane into position for the lift. With the new engineering advancements in crane set up, these cranes are now ideal for remote job site locations like wind farms. Compared to the heavy lifting power of a crawler crane, all terrain cranes are easier to set up and move around the job site which means they can help the installation crews get the job done quicker.

Grove_RT600E_Rough_Terrain_Crane_p3

Rough Terrain Cranes: Specially designed to operate off road, rough terrain cranes have all-wheel drive capabilities and rubber tires to help them navigate ditches and potholes in the road. With lower capacity lifting abilities, these cranes work well in situations where the lift radius and rough ground conditions don’t need high or heavy lifts. Many iron framed buildings implement the use of rough terrain cranes.

 

carry deck crane

Carry Deck Cranes: This type of mobile crane can rotate on a full 360 degrees axis, making them perfect for operating in confined construction areas. Exactly as the name suggests, carry deck cranes have small decks where they can lift and place equipment, like barrels, onto it’s deck and relocate it to another location on the job site.

Hydraulic Cranes: Run on hydraulics, oil is pushed from one cylinder to another to give this type of crane its awesome strength. Hydraulic mobile cranes are robust and reliable, so it comes as no surprise that they’re the most common. Most cranes today are hydraulic because of their safety features and smooth operation.

TNTImage960-7

An increase in the construction of building projects in challenging places means mobile cranes are heavily leaned upon to problem solve. The demand has led to the production of super large cranes with increased capabilities, such as the 500 to crane from LeibherrGrove or LinkBelt – a machine we frequently put to good use at Eagle West Cranes and Stampede Cranes.

With the above featuring on every construction workers’ ‘must have’ list, mobile cranes are now more important than ever.

Overhead Crane Inspection Guide

Overhead Crane Inspection Guide

Being prepared is the best way to avoid an accident, and this is especially true when it comes to overhead cranes. OSHA has found that an average of 71 crane-related fatalities happen each year. In most of these cases, an inspection could have identified the fatal problem before tragedy struck. That’s also not counting the thousands of less-serious accidents involving cranes that could have been prevented if the equipment had been subjected to the required inspection. Although these accidents may not result in the loss of life, they can result in injuries as well as serious fines for safety violations and costly downtime.

Regularly inspecting overhead crane equipment is one of the most important steps companies can take to cut down on these unfortunate crane-related incidents. However, it is crucial that operators and supervisors do more than give their equipment a quick glance to see if everything simply looks all right. Overhead crane equipment must be put through a rigorous and thorough inspection process before it can be cleared for safe crane operation. What’s more, there are dozens of inspection points that must be checked during these inspections. Additionally, certain inspection points must be checked on a more frequent basis than others, so it is essential that operators and supervisors understand OSHA’s requirements for these inspections. The following crane guide illustrates many of the most important inspection points on overhead crane equipment. By following it, companies can help ensure that their equipment and their job sites will be much safer and better prepared.

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Overhead Crane & Inspection Guidelines courtesy of Crane 1

Top 7 Types of Construction Cranes

Top 7 Types Of Construction Cranes

By March 20, 2017One Comment

crane is a tower or derrick that is equipped with cables and pulleys that are used to lift and lower material. They are commonly used in the construction industry and in the manufacturing of heavy equipment. Cranes for construction are normally temporary structures, either fixed to the ground or mounted on a custom built vehicle.

They can either be controlled from an operator in a cab that travels along with the crane, by a push button pendant control station, or by radio type controls.

As with all things in construction, the crane operator is ultimately responsible for the safety of the site, the rigging crews and the working crane. To learn more about crane safety you can read more about it here and see why Eagle WestStampede and TNT Crane are committed to safety first.

So what are the different types of cranes used in construction?

Mobile Cranes

The most standard and versatile type of crane used in construction today. The mobile hydraulic crane consists of a steel truss or telescopic boom mounted on a mobile platform, which could be a rail, wheeled, or even on a cat truck. The boom is hinged at the bottom and can be either raised or lowered by cables or hydraulic cylinders.

What makes this crane so versatile is it’s footprint and mobility. In construction situations, it can sometimes be difficult to get close to where you need to hoist the materials. Moving a crane into a postition that allows it to lift the material with the correct crane capacity is effected by the footprint of the crane. The foot print is the area required to have the crane set up it’s outriggers into position that allows it to hoist the material while inside the crane chart requirements.

Mobile_Cranes

Telescopic Crane

This type of crane offers a boom that consists of a number of tubes fitted one inside of the other. A hydraulic mechanism extends or retracts the tubes to increase or decrease the length of the boom. Most cranes today are in some form a telescopic crane. Except for the lattice boom crane with is a iron constructed frame that is bolted together to get the right height for the hoist.

Telescopic_Mobile_Crane

Tower Crane

The tower crane is a modern form of a balance crane. When fixed to the ground, tower cranes will often give the best combination of height and lifting capacity and are also used when constructing tall buildings. Some large tower cranes will reach up to 1000 meters high! With an average floor dimension of a high rise equaling 3.5 meters/floor. That’s a crazy 285 story building! Pretty encredible machines. One important thing to note about tower cranes, as they construct past a specific height, it is important to have the tower crane connected to the building to help prevent crane sway and crane tipping.

Tower_crane_picture

Truck Mounted Crane (also known as boom truck or picker truck)

Cranes mounted on a rubber tire truck will provide great mobility. Outriggers that extend vertically or horizontally are used to level and stabilize the crane during hoisting. The capacity of these cranes rarely exceed 50 ton capacity. As mentioned above, their versatility is found in their mobility and reach.

Truck_Mounted_Crane_Knuckle_Boom_picture

Rough Terrain Crane

A crane that is mounted on an undercarriage with four rubber tires, designed for operations off road. The outriggers extend vertically and horizontally to level and stabilize the crane when hoisting. These types of cranes are single engine machines where the same engine is used for powering the undercarriage as it is for powering the crane. These cranes are idea for constructions sites that have uneven, dirt and rocky terrain. The mobility and ability of the crane to travel around the site make it an effect support crane for lighter hoists on highway, construction and infrastructure projects.

Rough_terrain_crane_picture

Loader Crane (also know as a folding boom crane)

loader crane is a hydraulically powered articulated arm fitted to a trailer, used to load equipment onto a trailer. The numerous sections can be folded into a small space when the crane isn’t in use. The capacity of these cranes have increased dramatically over the years. Presently there are 200 ton capacity loader (folding boom) cranes on the market today.

Loader_Crane_picture

Overhead Crane

Also refered to as a suspended crane, this type is normally used in a factory, with some of them being able to lift very heavy loads. Larger overhead cranes (also known as goliath cranes) can be found in use in shipyards and large outdoor manufacturing plants. The hoist is set on a trolley which will move in one direction along one or two beams, which move at angles to that direction along elevated or ground level tracks, often mounted along the side of an assembly area.

Overhead_Crane_picture

Cranes are incredibly powerful and interesting machines. Most people are amazed when they see a crane at work. We marvel at their ability and it is impressive to see what it can accomplish. For the construction industry, it’s an incredibly powerful (some might say) indispensable pieces of equipment used today.

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How Working at Night Can Create a Safer Jobsite

Today, highway construction in urban areas is almost always performed at night. State Departments of Transportation (DOTs) around the country have discovered that night jobsites are safer and more efficient for a number of reasons.

  • Roadways can be closed at night without major public inconvenience.
  • Traffic is not an issue.
  • Worksites can be expanded.
  • Cranes have more space in which to operate and swing.

Working at night

OSHA and DOTs have developed comprehensive safety measures for nighttime jobsites, and modern construction lighting systems create a work environment that is as luminous as working in daylight. Crane-owning companies are adjusting to the increase in nighttime work, and crane manufacturers are looking for ways to adapt cranes to these conditions.

At ConExpo in March 2014, Link-Belt introduced its first crane with a standard lighting package, the 210-ton capacity ATC-3210. The lighting package on the new all-terrain crane makes it easier to set up and rig the crane in the dark hours of the early morning or dusk. There are high intensity LED lights on the front of the operator’s cab and at the outriggers. The engine bay now has lighting as do the ground control stations for outriggers and suspension. Other optional lighting includes high intensity work lights above the operator’s cab, lights that illuminate the walkways on the upper, a right-side, forward-facing high intensity work light and left and right high-intensity work lights mounted atop the upper to illuminate the swing area. Plus, remote-controlled single and dual boom floodlight options are available.

Albuquerque, NM-based Crane Service Inc. recently took delivery of a new Link-Belt ATC-3210 and has already seen the value in the new lighting package, according to Bob Warianka, business development manager.

While his company doesn’t do that much night work, he said it is becoming more prevalent. Warianka pointed to a recent job that involved the company’s ATC-3210 and ATC-3275 setting bridge girders at night.

“The contractor had the job lit up really well, with four light plants illuminating the work area of each crane,” he said.

While the crane’s lighting package isn’t really a factor in lighting up the worksite, it’s still a great convenience for rigging the crane.

Rigging asset

“The lights are really an asset when you are rigging the crane or setting it up in the early morning hours, or sometimes we will assemble a crane at night,” Warianka said. “We envision more crane companies offering better lighting packages in the future. I can see them being used on rough terrain cranes too.”

He said crawlers cranes would be the least likely cranes to be equipped with comprehensive lighting packages because the type of work they do at night generally involves a well-lit jobsite, and rigging a crawler is different than rigging a mobile crane.

“Tower cranes have lights on them,” said Warianka. “Tower cranes are sometimes on a job working 24 hours a day and two shifts. With mobile cranes, we can see a need for a lighting package for the short days of winter or when you want to keep working at dusk or during cloudy weather. These lights will also come in handy when doing concrete pours, like on a high-rise job. Sometimes concrete pours go into the night or start early in the morning. The lights you use on a crane will be job specific.”

Remote controls

In a few cases, Crane Service has provided lighting equipment, for instance when the crane might be grabbing on and needs to be tied to the load for a while.

He has been impressed with the remote-controlled lights on the new ATC-3210.

“The light on the boom can be operated by remote control so that you can actually rotate the light and spotlight something below the crane,” he said.

Rick Curnutte, product manager, telescopic truck and all-terrain cranes, Link-Belt, said the driving factor for the lighting package was lighting the jobsite, but for set up and tear down of the crane.

“People in our industry tell us what they want to see on a crane and we try to listen,” said Curnutte. “In order to beat traffic, cranes are being dispatched much earlier to the jobsite, and to be there in a timely manner, crews are often setting up the crane in the dark.”

Rigging a crane at night without big jobsite lighting systems means the crane owner will have to bring out his own lighting system. With a crane lighting package, the rigging is much easier.

Curnutte said that not having a lighting package makes it difficult to lay down mats and perform the ordinary challenges of rigging the crane in darkness.

Customer feedback has been positive, especially the remote control boom lights and the engine bay lights that allow the operator and rigger to check the oil and provide maintenance to the crane.

“There are lighting packages for looking down at loads on the boom and cab lighting, but I don’t think anyone has gone to the extent that Link-Belt has gone to,” Curnutte said.

While the new lighting package from Link-Belt has only been out for a few months, crane lighting has become a topic of discussion for customers, he said.

“It’s still early and there’s been a lot of discussion. How far we take it down the product line is going to depend on the demand we see. Definitely for the ATs it’s been a hit and the ATC-3275 will get the same lighting package as the ATC-3210. This idea definitely struck a chord when we showed it at ConExpo.”

Again, Curnutte stressed that Link-Belt’s goal with its crane lighting package is not to provide lighting for the jobsite lifting.

“There are some aspects of lighting we did that do benefit the jobsite, but you have to be cautious about using some of those lights during lifting because you have ground personnel who need to be able to look at the operator in the cab, and you don’t want the light affecting their vision or ability to see what they need to see. But generally, we feel like we’ve hit a home run with this lighting package.”

Author; D.Ann Shiffler

Source:

http://www.khl.com/magazines/american-cranes-and-transport/detail/item98603/A-bright-idea?source=breaking-news

Recent Use of Zoomlion Tower Cranes to Erect the Astana Expo 2017

With the recent Expo 2017 coming to Astana, Zoomlion placed and used multiple tower cranes to erect the pavilions main buildings.

The building has a diameter of 80m and a height of 100m, with pavilions of other countries evenly distributed around it in a ring shape.

Twelve large-tonnage Zoomlion tower cranes, seven Zoomlion truck cranes and one Zoomlion bulldozer have participated in the pavilion construction.  “Among which four Zoomlion D1100-63, the super-large tower cranes with the maximum hoisting capacity in the Central Asia,” said the manufacturer.

The D1100-63 is a new model of self-climbing tower crane, featuring superstructure slewing, double lifting points, level jib and horizontal trolleying. With a hoisting capacity of 9.8t at the 80m jib end, the tower crane adopts variable frequency stepless speed-regulating motor to significantly optimize the system’s running stability and improve positioning accuracy.  PLC (programmable logical controller) is used to control all actions.

The event will take place between June 10 and September 10, 2017.

This was the second time that Zoomlion has been involved in Expo construction, having helped to build the Chinese Pavilion in Expo 2015 Milano.

Zoomlion said: “The direct economic and trade cooperation and cultural exchanges between China and Kazakhstan are of far-reaching significance to promote the development of the “Belt and Road” [Chinese government-backed investment and trade strategy]. As a leading enterprise in the engineering machinery industry, Zoomlion has explored the market in Kazakhstan for over ten years, dedicated to efficiently helping the construction of local infrastructures.”

About the author: Crane Cafe is an organization connected to the crane industry to provide crane, crane operation and crane safety tips.

TNT Crane Opens A New Branch In Edmonton Alberta

TNT Crane & Rigging Canada Inc. opens new Branch in Edmonton, Alberta

TNT Crane & Rigging Canada is pleased to announce that it will open a branch office outside of Edmonton in Leduc, Alberta in July, 2016. The new branch will be located at 3310 Allard Avenue, Leduc, Alberta.

TNT is expanding into the area to provide crane services to existing and new customers in the region.  TNT crane services currently has seven branches stretching from British Columbia to Ontario servicing multiple industries including Oil & Gas, Wind Construction, Bridge & Road Construction as well as Commercial customers.

Bob Fairbank, President & CEO said “We are excited about opening our newest branch in Edmonton and bringing our experience and expertise to better serve our customers in the region. Edmonton offers great potential for growth and we look forward to expanding our customer base here through this commitment.”

About TNT Crane & Rigging

Founded in 1985, TNT Crane and Rigging is one of the largest crane service providers in North America.  TNT operates a modern fleet of more than 625 hydraulic truck, all terrain and crawler cranes ranging in lifting capacity from 8 tons to 1300 tons, plus a comprehensive inventory of gantry jacks, forklifts, rigging equipment, personnel and tractor/trailers.  The company has over 1,400 employees working in branch locations from Texas, Denver, Canada and the Atlantic seaboard. TNT has the equipment and experience to deliver lifting solutions efficiently and safely.